Subject:  Butterfly
Geographic location of the bug:  Southwest Florida
Date: 01/10/2020
Time: 03:39 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have identified & photographed well over 100 species of butterflies/moths over many years, but I am at a loss for the name of this beauty, and no amount of research has been successful.  Many thanks for your help!
Respectfully, Kathy Genaw
How you want your letter signed:  Kathy Genaw

Brush Footed Butterfly

Dear Kathy,
We too are having a difficult time identifying you Brush Footed Butterfly in the family Nymphalidae.  It looks most to us like the White Peacock,
Anartia jatrophae, which can be viewed on BugGuide and on Carolina Nature, and we suspect it is closely related.  It is found in Florida, but though the dorsal side is similar, the ventral side is quite different.  We suspect it might be closely related, and is most likely a tropical species that has found its way to Florida.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide a more conclusive identification.

Brush Footed Butterfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  My bug post
Geographic location of the bug:  Mt. Washington
Date: 01/07/2020
Time: 08:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have identified my bug and it is the Diabolical Ironclad Beetle. I also found your answer about it to another person. Good info thanks.
How you want your letter signed:  Jessica

Diabolical Ironclad Beetle

Dear Jessica,
You are absolutely correct with your identification of this Diabolical Ironclad Beetle,
Phloeodes diabolicus, a species that derives its common name because of its nearly impenetrable exoskeleton.  It seems you and Daniel are neighbors in Mount Washington, and it is nice to know that our local hippy chicks haven’t been totally supplanted by newer residents.

Subject:  What kind of bug??
Geographic location of the bug:  Outside my house. In Maryland. Minth of January and it’s currently around 51 degrees outside. Also, we’ve had some rain and it’s gloomy outside and possibly raining.
Date: 01/04/2020
Time: 04:55 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  So this bug was found in my stagnant fountain that hasn’t been used in years. They are on everything. My siding, chairs, propane tank but not in the house. They are a community bug it seems and when disturbed, they jump. They aren’t fleas and don’t look like springtails in my opinion. Please help. They freak me out and I have no idea of where they come from or how.
How you want your letter signed:  With a name

Globular Springtails

Dear viciousspirit,
The class Collembola is a diverse group of Hexapods, and your individuals are Globular Springtails in the order Symphypleona which is represented on BugGuide.

Globular Springtail

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Very Small Mottled Bugs on Front Steps
Geographic location of the bug:  New Jersey
Date: 01/04/2020
Time: 04:22 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi! I’m hoping you can help ID these bugs for me. There are hundreds of them on my front steps and they seem to jump when you get close to them. I saw something similar in past years on the snow and thought they were snow fleas but these look different under magnification. The temperature now is 52F. The pictures show them without magnification and under a 30x handheld microscope. I’m hoping you can help ID them. Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Dave W.

Globular Springtail

Dear Dave,
We suspected, based on your excellent description, your location, the time of year and the temperatures, that you were inquiring about Globular Springtails even before opening your excellent images.  They are benign creatures that can be a nuisance if they become too plentiful.  For the record, Snow Fleas and Globular Springtails are both members of the same primitive class Collembola.  You can find additional information on BugGuide.

Globular Springtails

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Dallas Texas Area
Date: 01/06/2020
Time: 01:51 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this guy on one of my Vitex bushes this Fall.  He is 3″ long. What is he going to be?
How you want your letter signed:  Clueless in Dallas

Hornworm: probably Manduca florestan

Dear Clueless in Dallas,
This is a Hornworm, the caterpillar of a moth in the family Sphingidae.  Thanks for providing the food plant.  When we searched for Sphingidae caterpillars that feed on Vitex, we found this posting for
Manduca florestan on Wikipedia, and we then checked on Sphingidae of the Americas where we found images that appear to match your individual.  Manduca florestan is listed as a stray in Texas.  We will contact Bill Oehlke to verify our identification.

Subject:  Not sure if it’s a wasp
Geographic location of the bug:  Mombasa, Kenya
Date: 12/30/2019
Time: 10:33 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve been wanting to post here for a while. I’m Kenyan and our bugs are not available on the internet as much as in Western or Asian countries. Since I live in a coastal area, I see so many insects that I would love to have identified. My home area has a lot pf insects that usually find their way into the house. I found my sister, Sian, had killed this one and upon closer inspection wanted to know if it’s a spider wasp, a great black wasp or even a wasp at all (though it has the tell tale slim “waist”). The species I found online of the spider wasp all have antennae that are brightly colored but this one only had orange tips. I thought it was a great black wasp, because of the sudden increase in grasshopper populations, but most sites say they are large and have no colored antennae. The body is hairy (including the abdomen) and shiny and it has “gradient” wings which change between a dark blue to black depending on the angle. Hoping to post more bugs in future…
How you want your letter signed:  Danson, future regular poster…

Scarab Hunter Wasp

Dear Danson,
This is definitely a wasp, but it is not a Spider Wasp.  In our opinion, it is a Flower Wasp or Scarab Hunter in the family Scoliidae, a group that preys upon the underground grubs of large Scarab Beetles, and Africa has numerous species of large Scarab Beetles, so there is a food supply for the Scarab Hunter Wasps.  We have not had any luck providing you with a species match.  According to BugGuide, a North American site, Scarab Hunter Wasps are “Robust, hairy, medium-sized to large.”  We look forward to your future submissions.

Thank you very much for the fast response… I’ll definitely post more…and you’re right, I think it’s a species of flower wasp…