Subject:  Blue jumping spider?
Geographic location of the bug:  Topeka KS
Date: 11/18/2019
Time: 05:55 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw a previous question about a blue jumping spider during my search. This little guy was at the storage units my mom works at. No altering to the photo at all. Not a hoax. I couldnt find much online about blue spiders. Coolest little spider I’ve seen. I think it’s a jumping spider?
How you want your letter signed:  Brandy

Jumping Spider

Dear Brandy,
This is definitely a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, and it does appear to be quite bluish, but we cannot provide you with a species name.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Thursday November 21, 2019
The thing that I cursed most today is the thing that also gave me a happy ending.  Much earlier today, the Academic Senate met and I passed a consent calendar with well over 100 course updates before having to give a report on other curricular matters as they affect the campus at large, largely a redundant statement.  I decided to change some water in the aquarium, and while siphoning out some water, the accident happened  and finally, after at least a month of trying, I caught the Rummy Nose Tetra, and without even bothering to try to acclimate it, I dropped it into the aquarium that creates such gorgeous prisms during the summer.  That aquarium has become a 1 each of a different species aquarium of survivors with a Cardinal Tetra, a Serpae Tetra, a South American Ram, the oldest fish in the aquarium that survived the heatwave last year, a
Plecostomus that has plenty of algae to eat and no competition for eating it that I am hoping is in such a favorable environment that it will live for so long that I am never without the aquarium.  Then there are the three Angelfish that were one by one chased from the home where they grew up: the Angelfish Abel always called the Black Swan, the Koi Angelfish female that hasn’t quite chosen between the two others, and the silver male that Abel said was labeled blue in the store where he found him.

The Black Swan and Blue battle while the coy Koi toys with their affections.

It’s time to start the Brine Shrimp.  The pair that defended their territory, the Gold Angelfish and the black lace Angelfish that Abel called Robin Hood are now alone in the 40 gallon aquarium with their third and largest and only surviving brood that were already traumatized because the glass that fell into the water crashed into the leaf they were all clustered on destroying the nursery where a wriggling mass of tadpole-like fry that had not yet started swimming.  The moment I got off the ladder and I saw the damage I had done to the nursery, I knew the fry that had dispersed would only get eaten if I didn’t get that Tetra out of there immediately.  The Tetra was already swimming around chomping down on all the fry that had dislodged during the accident and fallen to the bottom of the aquarium.  The couple, after two attempts to raise a brood, had finally figured where to lay their eggs successfully out of reach of the Tetra and my clumsiness caused me to cuss at the glass that if it hadn’t fallen into the water would not have triggered the chain of events that I hope leads to a new family of well-fed Angelfish fry when I return from Ohio after Thanksgiving, and after gasping, up-side-down and dazed at the bottom of the other aquarium for several minutes, that wily old Rummy Nose Tetra that had been eluding the net for the past month and for a good ten minutes today is swimming again.

Robin Hood (top) and the Gold Angelfish after gathering their scattered fry.

Subject:  Leaflike grasshopper
Geographic location of the bug:  Ventura, California
Date: 11/16/2019
Time: 07:15 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I’ve noticed this grasshopper in my yard in several places lately. First he was stuck in my house and I caught him and took him outside. Today I got a great shot of him on the plumeria tree. His body looks so much like a leaf! Do you know what his name is?
How you want your letter signed:  Tonja…we met at a party in Ventura!

Pinkish Bush Katydid

Dear Tonja,
We were talking on the phone this evening with Melanie on the Irish Chain and we commented that we hadn’t posted to WTB? recently because we are so busy.  This pinkish Katydid is awesome looking.  Most Katydids are green in color, and occasionally individuals from some normally green species are vividly pink, and some are more subtly pink. We believe your individual is a Broad-Winged Katydid,
Microcentrum rhombifolium, which we located on the Natural History of Orange County site, or perhaps the closely related California Angle-Winged Katydid, Microcentrum californicum, which we located on BugGuide.  We have not had any luck locating any unusual color variants of either species.  We will attempt to contact Piotr Naskrecki for species confirmation. We find it closer visually to the Plumeria buds rather than its leaves, and with the unusual coloration of your individual, we would go so far as to say it is almost camouflaged among the buds. 

Pinkish Bush Katydid

Hi Daniel!
Thanks so much for your e-mail.  You really made me laugh with your “talking with Melanie on the Irish Chain”.  haha That’s really great.  As you may know, Melanie gave me the idea to contact you to ask about this fascinating bug…now I know it’s an Katydid (I’ve always loved that word!).  I sure am glad I asked you, because I was wrongly identifying it as a grasshopper…even though I’ve seen grasshoppers in my yard and they look different than this guy.  So, THANK YOU for your reply and all the wonderful information!
I hope life is treating you well and hope to meet you again one day.
Blessings,
Tonja
Correction courtesy of renowned Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki
Hi Daniel,
Not a Microcentrum but Scudderia. Very interesting, pink forms are not common in this genus.
Cheers,
Piotr
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Butterfly
Geographic location of the bug:  North Queensland
Date: 11/16/2019
Time: 01:14 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello we have a butterfly from north Queensland, the name we were given was Marfarlane’s Triangle, but we cannot find that name online so cannot find the species name, can you please help us
How you want your letter signed:  Hannah & Ellie

Green Triangle

Dear Hannah & Ellie,
We located images of a similar looking butterfly called a Blue Triangle,
Graphium sarpedon, on the Brisbane Insect site, and additional searching of that genus name brought us to the Green Triangle, Graphium macfarlanei, on Butterfly House, and we suspect the common name Marfarlane’s Triangle can also be used.

Green Triangle

Subject:  Identify this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Columbus, N.M.
Date: 11/08/2019
Time: 10:00 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We are on the border of New Mexico and saw this bug about the approx  size of a quarter.
How you want your letter signed:  Gaila

Blister Beetle: Megetra species

Dear Gaila,
This is a Blister Beetle in the genus
Megetra and we identified it on BugGuide.  There are three species in the genus, and two are found in New Mexico, but they look so similar, we cannot discern a difference.

Subject:  Bug I can’t identify
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern NJ
Date: 11/11/2019
Time: 01:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw these on a pin oak this morning
How you want your letter signed:  Ryan Moore

Giant Bark Aphids

Dear Ryan,
We quickly identified what we suspected were Giant Bark Aphids,
Longistigma caryae, on BugGuide, but there were no images of what we suspected might be eggs.  The Bug of the Week site has a nice image with the caption:  “Eggs of the giant bark aphid are the overwintering stage. They line small branches by the thousands and change from amber to black as they age.”

Giant Bark Aphids

Giant Bark Aphids