Subject:  some kind of horn worm?
Geographic location of the bug:  Boulder City  Nevada 89005
Date: 05/17/2019
Time: 11:06 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This is not our standard tomato hornworm/sphinx moth but is a different horn worm?
Please help me ID this caterpillar!
How you want your letter signed:  Dr. Merkler

Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Dr. Merkler,
This is a highly variably colored Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillar, a species that is known for extreme population explosions in desert areas following winters of significantly heavy rainfall.  In April, Daniel  saw thousands of dark colored Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillars feeding on wildflowers in Joshua Tree National Park.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Ladybird spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Patras, Greece
Date: 05/15/2019
Time: 02:29 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi! Here are some photos from our school yard
How you want your letter signed:  Wendy

Male Ladybird Spider

Dear Wendy,
Thanks for sending in your awesome image of an endangered male Ladybird Spider.

Subject:  Unknown Moth Chrysalis?
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern VA
Date: 05/18/2019
Time: 03:06 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, I was walking today (May 18) and found this unusual growth on a small tree sapling off of the neighborhood trail. I’ve searched but have only found one image even close and it was a silk moth chrysalis.
How you want your letter signed:  N. Celata

Oak Apple Gall

Dear N. Celata,
Your sapling appears to be a young Oak and this is a Gall, a growth that appears on plants and is often caused by an insect.  Oaks are hosts to many different Gall Wasps that produce Galls.  Based on images posted to Discover Life, we believe this is an Oak Apple Gall,
Amphibolips confluenta.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle or Fly
Geographic location of the bug:  Mcminnville,Oregon
Date: 05/18/2019
Time: 03:33 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Our family came across this bug, it was resting on new grounds trail post,near our local woods. We have searched for identical bugs. Nothing has came close to identification. This particular bug did not mind movement or noise as it stayed silent amd still on the fresh wooden post! Maybe a wood beetle? Since the trail post were fresh built, or imported bug on wood the carpenders gathered to build post?! Very interesting.
How you want your letter signed:  To the rasmussen boys

Western Sculptured Pine Borer

Dear Rasmussen Boys,
This looks like a Western Sculptured Pine Borer,
Chalcophora angulicollis, to us.  According to BugGuide:  “Dark brown to black, sculptures on upper side, irridescent bronze luster, especially on underside. Fly noisily when alarmed. The only western species in the genus.

Subject:  Mantis
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 05/17/2019
Time: 06:32 PM PDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
My Cannabis sprouts are growing, and I just found this tiny Mantis on one of the plants.
How you want your letter signed: Constant Gardener

Mantis hatchling

Dear Constant Gardener,
We appreciate your first submission of 2019 and we eagerly await more documentation of the insects associated with your 2019 crop.

Subject:  Spider wasp and prey
Geographic location of the bug:  Charleston, Illinois
Date: 05/15/2019
Time: 01:11 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw you were looking for a image of this spider and its prey. Just a cell phone picture but shows key features.
How you want your letter signed:  Christopher S

Spider Wasp and Wolf Spider Prey

Dear Christopher,
Thanks so much for submitting your awesome image of a Spider Wasp,
Entypus unifasciatus, and its Wolf Spider prey.  The Wolf Spider will not be eaten by the Spider Wasp.  She feeds on nectar from flowers, and the paralyzed Wolf Spider will provide fresh food for a larval Spider Wasp which will eat its paralyzed meal alive.