Subject:  A beetle I’m assuming…
Geographic location of the bug:  San Francisco Bay Area (East Bay)
Date: 06/10/2019
Time: 03:31 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello! I’m finding these large, 1 1/2-2” beetles hanging out completely still in my driveway during the summer months. I’m not looking to get rid of them, just like to know a bit more about what scares the crap out of me when I’m taking the trash out late at night! (They’re HUGE!). Thanks.
How you want your letter signed:  Kara W.

California Root Borer

Dear Kara,
This is a California Root Borer, one of the largest Beetles native to California.  They are attracted to lights, which might be the reason you are finding them in your driveway.  Though they are not aggressive, they do have very powerful mandibles, so you should handle with caution to avoid a nip.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Florida
Date: 06/11/2019
Time: 05:46 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This guy was crawling around on my patio table, was wondering what it might be!
How you want your letter signed:  Tina

Milkweed Assassin Bug

Dear Tina,
This is a beneficial, predatory Milkweed Assassin Bug, and like other Assassin Bugs, it should be handled with caution as it might bite if provoked.  The bite is reported to be painful, but is not considered dangerous.

Subject:  What’s this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Upstate South Carolina, USA
Date: 06/11/2019
Time: 09:55 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, I normally use iNaturalist to identify the organisms I find, but this time it is completely wrong. It is identifying this insect as a black widow but it clearly has 6 legs and is red with black dots, not black with red spots. Please can you help me identify this bug.
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks, Brandi

Wheel Bug Nymph

Dear Brandi,
This is most certainly NOT a Black Widow.  This is a Wheel Bug nymph, and nymphs as well as adult Wheel Bugs are among our most common spring through fall identification requests from the eastern parts of North America.  Though they are not dangerous, Wheel Bugs should be handled with caution as they might deliver a painful bite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this
Geographic location of the bug:  Richmond Va
Date: 06/12/2019
Time: 10:30 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this thing that was crawling on the sidewalk of my kids’ school today?
How you want your letter signed:  Crystal

Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Crystal,
This is the caterpillar of a Tiger Swallowtail butterfly.  There are several species in your area, and our best guess is that this is the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail,
Papilio glaucus.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  The adult Eastern Tiger Swallowtail is a gorgeous butterfly.

Subject:  What is the beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Marlborough, MA
Date: 06/12/2019
Time: 11:04 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We can’t tell if this is a white spotted Sawyer or a Asian longhorn.
How you want your letter signed:  Cory

White Spotted Sawyer

Dear Cory,
The white scuttelum, between the base of the wings, indicates that this is a White Spotted Sawyer.

Subject:  What kind of bug is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Yuba city California
Date: 06/12/2019
Time: 12:36 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I want to know what kind of big this is and if it’s good for my plants or not
How you want your letter signed:  Carol

Assassin Bug Nymph

Dear Carol,
This is a beneficial, predatory, immature Assassin Bug, probably in the genus
Zelus, and it will patrol your Cannabis plant for plant eating insects.  Exercise caution as Assassin Bugs in the genus Zelus may bite if carelessly handled and the bite is reported to be quite painful, but not dangerous, unlike Kissing Bugs, another group of Assassin Bugs, that are known to spread Chagas Disease, especially in the tropics.